If things change

If the environment changes, the container changes. This is clear to anyone who tries to camouflage themself in order to disappear from view, to pretend to be something else – in other words – to change the perception that others have of you. If you are a sole it is a good solution if you’re dealing with someone who would prefer you in his belly. But if the question is not who eats whom, but how to be more convincing, we might as well show our best sides and start to become more attractive. In this case, being seen, is a more interesting solution because it establishes differences and gives others the opportunity to choose more easily.
 
If you change the container, the content changes. The puffer fish knows this and when the time is right absorbs a great amount of water making him swell to such a size as to make him an improbable target even for the most motivated predator. If the outer form changes, the content also changes, passing from the perception of a quick snack to a premonition of an inedible mouthful. The puffer technique is very familiar to marketing people, who know that a container is like a promise that is bound to its content, and by designers who make containers the most promising containers possible.
 
If you change the content, the container changes. This is familiar to those for whom metamorphosis has a biological reason. If you’re a tadpole you don’t have much choice, first you are one first and then you become something very different. Inside, your gills are transformed into lungs; outside, you lose your tail, sprout legs with which to make extraordinary leaps and leave your pond neighbours speechless, yes, exactly those you though your were merely a half-fish with no future. Changing both the inside and outside is another life.
 
Paolo Rossetti

Date

July 2016